MOLLY SIMS & EMESE GORMLEY

MOLLY SIMS & EMESE GORMLEY

FADE IN:

INT. CHARLIE BIRD, SOHO, NEW YORK CITY — LATE MORNING

A quiet calm occupies Charlie Bird restaurant, on King Street in Manhattan, as the waitstaff arranges place settings just so before the lunch crowd arrives. Light creeps slowly across the dining room as the sun emerges from behind a cloud outside. EMESE GORMLEY enters, and a hostess leads her to a tucked-away corner table. EMESE settles into a toffee-colored leather booth, and orders an iced coffee.

CUT TO:

MOLLY SIMS walks in, and spots EMESE from across the room. MOLLY walks to the table, EMESE stands to greet her, and the two exchange a sisterly embrace. They get cozy in the booth, and MOLLY asks for a cup of tea.

MOLLY
We met because I loved your hair. I’m serious!

EMESE
I remember that moment. We were at the Sundance Film Festival, I had just moved to the States from Canada, and I was like: Molly Sims likes my hair!

MOLLY
You kept talking to me, you said, “If you’re ever in New York and want to get together…” And I thought, “Okay, yeah, whatever. I’ve got friends.” You’d always call, and, honestly, I think the first time I called you was only because I tried everyone else and nobody answered.

EMESE
I had just broken up with a guy, and you had just started dating one.

MOLLY
Within the first fifteen minutes, you were asking if I had this beauty product, or that one. You’re still my go-to beauty guru. And we’ve talked every day since then.

EMESE
You’ve always been honest — you say exactly what you think, but never in a negative way. To me, a friend is the person who says, “You don’t look healthy right now, how can we fix that?” Remember when I got my hair colored a few years ago? I walked into Barney’s to meet you and your mom, and I thought I had this gorgeous, new chestnut color —

MOLLY
And I said, “You have mousy brown hair. Get out.” It was so bad [laughs].

EMESE
I spent the next eight hours having the color stripped from my hair. But, here’s the thing: You’re not a snob, and you’re not the girl who thinks your shit don’t stink.

MOLLY
I really struggled with The Everyday Supermodel as the title for my book. When we talked about it, you said, “You’re going to get killed for that.” But it’s about showing a woman she can change something if she wants to, about finding her inner X factor, her inner Beyoncé. You did a lot to get me to this point; you pushed me to start a blog. “This is the future,” you said.

EMESE
I’m not quiet! To me, the epicenter of the book is how to be a willing participant in your own evolution and improve yourself. You’ve kind of always encouraged that among your friends.

MOLLY
There’s a section devoted to ‘my girls’ — one’s a lawyer, one’s a writer, one works in fashion and another worked for a beauty company. We’re very different, but all of us want to help each other and be pioneers for women. None of us are wallflowers.

EMESE
We’re doers; we don’t sit back and say, “I can’t.” Sure, we feel sorry for ourselves every once in awhile, and we’ve been victims —

MOLLY
Like that time I got dumped and we stalked the guy at Starbucks [laughs]!

EMESE
It was Thanksgiving —

MOLLY
And I made you listen to “Bicycle vs. Car” by Bob Schneider — the most depressing song — on repeat. It’s been amazing what you, and our seven other girlfriends, have brought to my life. Now that I’m a mom, the better I feel about myself, the better mother I am. People will probably kill me for saying this, but being at home with a child is the single hardest job.

EMESE
After having Maeve — your goddaughter — I had to figure out how to balance being a mom and working. I’ve seen kids who joke about their mothers, like: Oh, she’s at the tennis club; she’s going shopping. I want to be the mother my daughter deserves, but also set a good example for her.

MOLLY
My mom had two kids, worked a full time job, and still looked good going to the grocery store. She and my dad were those people who are like: You can be anyone or anything you want to be.

EMESE
Childhood was different for me. My parents are immigrants, and to them there were two professions: Lawyer or doctor. When I told my dad I wanted to pursue public relations in college, he was like: What the fuck is that?

MOLLY
Even though my folks were the exact opposite, I don’t know if I’d want my son, Brooks, or my baby girl, in this business. There’s so much pressure, and being in the public eye can really destroy someone. I started modeling when I was 17 — I went to high school, took my SATs, and went to college… I busted my ass. One problem I have with millennials is they’re often not interested in putting in the hard work.

EMESE
I still remember the coffee order I had to get for my first boss: A vanilla soy latte. Every single day. The one time I got fired, I remember knocking on your door — you’d been at a Dolce & Gabbana party the night before, and still had your eye makeup on [laughs]. I’d never failed at anything in that way, and I was in shock. But you were like: It’s okay; we’re going to figure this out.

MOLLY
The good thing about you and me is that we can be devastated, and still say, “What are we going to do about it?” You’ve been doing PR for 17 years now, and continue to think outside the box — you did it at Diane von Furstenberg, Club Monaco, and NEXT — and that’s how you’ve built a great consulting company.

EMESE
There’s an older school of thought where spending hundreds of thousands of dollars on two ad pages in Vogue is still considered relevant, but the younger generation will say the world of new media, like converting sales online, is a lot more interesting. I’m somewhere in the middle, but everyone knows that print magazines aren’t profitable anymore.

MOLLY
People want information immediately.

EMESE
Exactly. News happens a lot faster now, and that means it becomes stale a lot quicker too. One hundred percent of the industry has changed. It’s been super interesting to watch that happen and be a part of it all.

MOLLY
When I started out, there weren’t a lot of models whose names people even recognized. Cindy, Naomi, Kate… really, just a few of us. I always looked at it as an adventure, even when I was poor as shit and depressed. I was lonely, but I was happy. I’m thrilled the fashion industry embraces more diversity now, like plus-size models. And I will say this to anyone: Work gets work. Nothing was ever too good for me. Some girls would say, “If I can’t get Vogue, I won’t be happy.” I was just glad to get my makeup done. My glass is always half full.

CREDITS

Photography byChris Bernabeo

Conversation moderated byAnthony Rotunno

Special thanksCharlie Bird

Molly Sims is a model, actress, and the author of The Everyday Supermodel.
Emese Gormley is the founder of EG Inc., a consulting agency based in New York City.

Did you see? Makeup artists and best friends, Tamah Krinsky & Sage Maitri, each remember the day they met, Dr. Jane Aronson, CEO of the Worldwide Orphans Foundation, takes The Thick Questionnaire.

THE END